Antibiotics Articles A-Z

Leviquin - Minocycline and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Antibiotics Articles containing information on subjects from Leviquin to Minocycline and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Leviquin
    Levaquin is a prescription antibiotic used for treating many different kinds of bacterial infections. This eMedTV segment covers other Levaquin uses and explains what to be aware of before using this drug. Leviquin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Leviquinn
    If you have been exposed to inhaled anthrax, your doctor may prescribe the antibiotic Levaquin. This eMedTV Web page explains what else Levaquin is used for and describes how the drug works. Leviquinn is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Levkin
    Levaquin is used for treating bacterial infections and preventing infection after anthrax exposure. This eMedTV page further describes Levaquin and explains what to tell your doctor before using this drug. Levkin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Levoquin
    Various types of bacterial infections can be treated with Levaquin. This eMedTV page describes how Levaquin works, explains what forms are available, and lists common side effects of the antibiotic. Levoquin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Levquin
    Levaquin is an antibiotic used for treating infections and preventing infection after anthrax exposure. This eMedTV page covers these uses in more detail and lists the various forms of Levaquin available. Levquin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Liquid Amoxicillin
    As explained in this eMedTV page, amoxicillin liquid comes in two varieties: pediatric drops and oral suspension. This article offers information on how to use amoxicillin and describes how this particular antibiotic works to fight bacterial infections.
  • Liquid Augmentin
    Augmentin is a prescription antibiotic approved for treating various types of infections. As this eMedTV Web page explains, Augmentin comes in liquid, tablet, and chewable tablet form. The medication is approved for use in both adults and children.
  • Liquid Doxycycline
    As this eMedTV article discusses, liquid doxycycline may help treat several conditions, such as bacterial infections, gum disease, acne, or rosacea. This page also describes how this prescription medication works and lists the available strengths.
  • Liquid Keflex
    As this eMedTV article discusses, liquid Keflex may help treat bacterial infections and prevent heart valve infections. This page also describes how this prescription medication works, lists the available strengths, and outlines possible side effects.
  • Liquid Levaquin
    Levaquin is a prescription antibiotic that comes in the form of tablets, a liquid, and an injection. This eMedTV resource offers dosing tips and precautions for taking liquid Levaquin and describes the specific effects of this medication.
  • Liquid Omnicef
    As this eMedTV page discusses, liquid Omnicef may help treat bacterial infections such as pneumonia and sinus infections. This page also describes how this prescription medication works, lists the available strengths, and outlines possible side effects.
  • Liviquin
    Levaquin is used to treat bacterial infections and to prevent certain infections. This eMedTV article describes this antibiotic in more detail and explains how Levaquin dosing is determined. Liviquin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Macrobid
    Macrobid is an antibiotic used to treat urinary tract infections. As this eMedTV article explains, it is long-acting and only needs to be taken twice a day. This page takes an in-depth look at the uses, dosing guidelines, and side effects of this drug.
  • Macrobid 100 mg Capsules
    Available as 100-mg capsules, Macrobid is a prescription drug used to treat urinary tract infections. This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at some of the medication's dosing guidelines and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Macrobid and Breastfeeding
    It is generally considered safe for breastfeeding women to take Macrobid. This selection from the eMedTV archives takes a closer look at the safety of this antibiotic in nursing women, explaining some of the potential problems that could occur.
  • Macrobid and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered safe for pregnant women to take Macrobid (except after week 38). This part of the eMedTV library takes a closer look at using this antibiotic during pregnancy, explaining the results of animal studies on this topic.
  • Macrobid Antibiotic Information
    A prescription antibiotic, Macrobid is used for the treatment of urinary tract infections. This segment of the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Macrobid, explaining the dosing guidelines for the drug and listing possible side effects.
  • Macrobid Capsules
    As this eMedTV article explains, Macrobid capsules are prescribed for the treatment of urinary tract infections. This Web page provides more details on this topic, explaining some of the dosing guidelines. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Macrobid Dosage
    The recommended Macrobid dosage is 100 mg twice daily for seven days. This page of the eMedTV Web library explains the dosing guidelines for this antibiotic in detail, including information on whether Macrobid should be taken with food.
  • Macrobid Drug Information
    Macrobid is an antibiotic used to treat bladder infections. This eMedTV segment offers more information on Macrobid, including details on how the drug works, possible side effects, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Macrobid Drug Interactions
    Probenecid and norfloxacin are two of the medications that can cause drug interactions with Macrobid. This eMedTV page provides a detailed list of medicines that can interfere with this antibiotic and explains what can happen when interactions occur.
  • Macrobid Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource explains, a Macrobid overdose is unlikely to cause serious problems, but you should still seek medical care. This article describes what to expect with an overdose of this antibiotic, including symptoms and treatment options.
  • Macrobid Side Effects
    Headache, flatulence, and nausea are some of the most common side effects of Macrobid. This eMedTV selection further describes the possible side effects of this antibiotic, with information on serious problems that require immediate medical care.
  • Macrobid Uses
    A prescription antibiotic, Macrobid is approved to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). This eMedTV segment discusses in detail this licensed Macrobid use, explaining how the drug works to treat UTIs and whether it is approved for use in children.
  • Macrobid Warnings and Precautions
    People with anemia or diabetes are more likely to have nerve problems while taking Macrobid. This part of the eMedTV site discusses the safety precautions for Macrobid in more detail, including important warnings on the possibility of liver problems.
  • Marcobid
    Available by prescription, Macrobid is an antibiotic used to treat bladder infections. This page from the eMedTV library gives an overview of this drug and includes a link to more detailed information. Marcobid is a common misspelling of Macrobid.
  • Metranidazole
    Metronidazole is an antibiotic used to treat infections caused by parasites and anaerobic bacteria. This eMedTV article explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug. Metranidazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metranidozole
    Metronidazole is a type of antibiotic used for treating parasitic and bacterial infections. This eMedTV resource describes how this medicine works and lists possible side effects to be aware of. Metronidozole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronadazole
    The prescription drug metronidazole is licensed to treat various types of infections. This eMedTV article discusses these uses in more detail and explains how this antibiotic works. Metronadazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronadizole
    Metronidazole is especially useful for treating infections caused by parasites or anaerobic bacteria. This eMedTV page describes these approved uses in more detail and further describes this drug. Metronadizole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metrondazole
    Metronidazole is an antibiotic used for treating various types of infections. This page on the eMedTV site explains how this drug works, describes its specific effects, and links to more information. Metrondazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metroniadazole
    Metronidazole, a prescription antibiotic, is approved to treat various types of infections. This eMedTV page describes this medication in more detail and lists some of its common side effects. Metroniadazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metroniazole
    Metronidazole is a prescription drug used for the treatment of certain infections. This eMedTV page describes the various forms available, lists possible side effects, and links to more information. Metroniazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metroniclazole
    Metronidazole is a prescription medicine commonly used for treating infections. This eMedTV resource describes how the drug works and explains what to be aware of before starting treatment. Metroniclazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronidazol
    Metronidazole is a prescription drug licensed to treat certain bacterial or parasitic infections. This eMedTV page describes how this medication works and explains what forms are available. Metronidazol is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronidazole
    Metronidazole is an antibiotic often prescribed to treat different types of infections. This eMedTV Web page explains what forms and strengths the medication comes in, describes how it works, lists some of its possible side effects, and more.
  • Metronidazole 250 mg
    There are only two strengths available for regular, oral metronidazole: 250 mg and 500 mg tablets. This eMedTV segment lists the other strengths available for oral metronidazole and offers tips and precautions for using this particular medicine.
  • Metronidazole 500 mg
    There are three strengths available for the tablet form of oral metronidazole: 500 mg, 250 mg, and 750 mg. This eMedTV resource provides dosing tips for those using this medication and offers general warnings and precautions to be aware of.
  • Metronidazole and Alcohol
    Many doctors believe that metronidazole and alcohol interact in a severe or even dangerous way. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, recent clinical studies have failed to demonstrate a significant interaction between the two.
  • Metronidazole and Breastfeeding
    Metronidazole is known to pass through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV segment offers more details on breastfeeding and metronidazole use, and describes the problems that may occur in infants who are exposed to the drug through breast milk.
  • Metronidazole and Pregnancy
    It is currently unclear whether metronidazole is completely safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV resource offers more information on metronidazole and pregnancy, and explores what problems may occur if an unborn child is exposed to this drug.
  • Metronidazole Antibiotic Information
    Metronidazole is an antibiotic licensed to treat various infections. This eMedTV article offers more information on this prescription medication, including an explanation of how it works and what you should be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Metronidazole Capsules
    There is only one strength available for metronidazole capsules (375 mg). This eMedTV resource lists the other forms and strengths available for oral metronidazole products and offers general warnings and precautions for those using this medication.
  • Metronidazole Cream
    Topical metronidazole products come in the form of creams, gels, and lotions. This page from the eMedTV site offers general information on when and how to use metronidazole cream and discusses the various approved uses for these products.
  • Metronidazole Dosage
    For amebic dysentery, the recommended dose of metronidazole is 750 mg three times a day for 5 to 10 days. This eMedTV page also offers dosing guidelines for treating trichomoniasis, other amebic infections, bacterial vaginosis, and anaerobic infections.
  • Metronidazole Drug Interactions
    If you take warfarin, lithium, or certain seizure medicines with metronidazole, problems may result. This eMedTV page lists other medications that may interact with metronidazole and explains what may happen if these drugs are taken together.
  • Metronidazole Medicine Information
    Metronidazole is an antibiotic approved to treat certain parasitic and bacterial infections. This eMedTV page provides more information on metronidazole medicines, including details on the specific approved uses and general warnings and precautions.
  • Metronidazole Oral
    Metronidazole is a common drug used to treat parasitic and bacterial infections. This eMedTV Web page explains what metronidazole oral and topical forms are used for, describes how the medicine works, and offers general dosing information.
  • Metronidazole Overdose
    Taking too much metronidazole does not seem to be especially toxic. As this page on the eMedTV site explains, in cases of suicide attempts and accidental overdoses of metronidazole, coordination problems and nausea and vomiting were common effects.
  • Metronidazole Pills
    Oral metronidazole pills are available in the form of capsules and tablets (short-acting and long-acting). This eMedTV page explains what this medicine is used for and offers general information on how to use it to ensure an effective treatment process.
  • Metronidazole Prescription Drugs
    Many different metronidazole prescription drugs are available, including brand-name and generic drugs. This eMedTV Web page provides a list of prescription metronidazole products and explains which ones are not available in generic form.
  • Metronidazole Reactions
    Many doctors believe that if you are taking metronidazole, reactions may occur if you drink alcohol. This eMedTV Web page further explores this common belief and lists some of the potential side effects that may occur with this medication.
  • Metronidazole Side Effects
    Potential side effects seen with metronidazole include diarrhea or constipation, dizziness, and nausea. This eMedTV Web page includes a more complete list of possible side effects and explains which problems may require medical attention.
  • Metronidazole Tablets
    Metronidazole comes in many forms; for the oral form of metronidazole, tablets and capsules are available. This eMedTV page lists the various strengths available for this form of the medication and offers general information on how to safely use it.
  • Metronidazole Warnings and Precautions
    If you have epilepsy, tell your doctor before you start taking metronidazole. This eMedTV article provides several precautions and warnings with metronidazole to be aware of, including possible side effects and who should avoid the drug.
  • Metronidiazole
    Doctors may prescribe metronidazole to treat infections caused by parasites and anaerobic bacteria. This eMedTV article explains how this medicine works and lists its potential side effects. Metronidiazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronidizole
    Metronidazole is an antibiotic often prescribed to treat various types of infections. This eMedTV resource discusses these uses in more detail and explains what forms this drug comes in. Metronidizole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronidozale
    Metronidazole is an antibiotic approved to treat certain bacterial and parasitic infections. This eMedTV Web page describes this drug in more detail and explains how long treatment usually lasts. Metronidozale is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronidozole
    The antibiotic metronidazole is approved to treat certain bacterial and parasitic infections. This eMedTV page describes this medication in more detail and lists some side effects that may occur. Metronidozole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronitazol
    If you have a bacterial or parasitic infection, your doctor may prescribe metronidazole. This eMedTV article discusses these uses in more detail and offers general warnings to be aware of. Metronitazol is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronitazole
    Metronidazole, an antibiotic, is used for treating some types of bacterial or parasitic infections. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and explains what side effects may occur. Metronitazole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Metronizadole
    The prescription antibiotic metronidazole is used for treating various types of infections. This eMedTV page covers these uses in more detail and lists possible side effects to be aware of. Metronizadole is a common misspelling of metronidazole.
  • Minocyclin
    Minocycline is a generic medication approved to treat bacterial infections. This eMedTV segment covers other minocycline uses, explains how the drug works, and lists its potential side effects. Minocyclin is a common misspelling of minocycline.
  • Minocycline
    Minocycline is an antibiotic commonly used to treat bacterial infections, anthrax infections, and acne. This eMedTV resource further discusses the drug, including its effects, general dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Minocycline and Breastfeeding
    Traditionally, minocycline has not been recommended for nursing women. However, as this resource from the eMedTV Web site explains, this point of view may be changing. This article provides an overview of minocycline use and breastfeeding.
  • Minocycline and Pregnancy
    Minocycline can cause fetal problems when taken during pregnancy. This eMedTV page covers this topic in detail, including why this medicine is considered a pregnancy Category D drug and when minocycline may be given to a pregnant woman.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.