Antibiotics Articles A-Z

Doxycycline Drug Interactions - Flagyl 750 mg Tablets

This page contains links to eMedTV Antibiotics Articles containing information on subjects from Doxycycline Drug Interactions to Flagyl 750 mg Tablets. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Doxycycline Drug Interactions
    If certain medicines are used in combination with doxycycline, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment offers a list of drugs that may cause negative results if used simultaneously with doxycycline, such as warfarin and barbiturates.
  • Doxycycline for a UTI (Urinary Tract Infection)
    If you have a urinary tract infection (UTI), you may benefit from doxycycline. This eMedTV article further discusses using this drug for a urinary tract infection, including information on how the medicine works and general dosing guidelines.
  • Doxycycline for Acne
    When used for treating acne, doxycycline reduces inflammation and the growth of bacteria. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at doxycycline, including information on how it works and why it may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Doxycycline for Children
    Doxycycline is approved for people age 8 years old and older. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses children and doxycycline, including some general dosing guidelines for using this medication in children.
  • Doxycycline for Rosacea
    A healthcare provider may treat rosacea with the prescription drug doxycycline. This part of the eMedTV Web site further discusses doxycycline, including how this antibiotic works for rosacea treatment and dosing tips.
  • Doxycycline Hyclate
    Doxycycline hyclate is an antibiotic licensed to treat bacterial infections, anthrax infections, and acne. This eMedTV page explains how the drug is also used for malaria prevention and describes its effects, side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Doxycycline Hyclate 100 mg
    A doctor may prescribe 100 mg doxycycline hyclate to treat various types of bacterial infections. This eMedTV Web article provides a brief overview of doxycycline hyclate dosing guidelines, including tips on when and how to use this antibiotic.
  • Doxycycline Indications
    As this eMedTV page discusses, doxycycline is a prescription drug used to treat a number of conditions, such as bacterial infections, acne, and rosacea. This page takes a closer look at indications for doxycycline, including possible "off-label" uses.
  • Doxycycline Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource discusses important information on doxycycline, a medication used for treating various conditions (such as bacterial infections, acne, and rosacea). This page also explains why doxycycline may not be suitable for some people.
  • Doxycycline Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oral doxycycline products may be prescribed to treat several conditions (such as acne, bacterial infections, and rosacea). This page also describes how this drug works and lists the available strengths.
  • Doxycycline Overdose
    If a person has overdosed on doxycycline, symptoms may include nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV Web resource describes other symptoms that can occur with an overdose of this drug, as well as some possible treatment options that are available.
  • Doxycycline Pills
    Doxycycline is available in many forms (including injection, liquid, and pills). As this eMedTV page explains, doxycycline treats several conditions, such as bacterial infections, rosacea, and acne. This article gives an overview of the medication.
  • Doxycycline Precautions and Warnings
    Doxycycline precautions and warnings listed in this eMedTV article include possible side effects and those who should not take it. For example, skin reactions that resemble sunburns may occur if you are exposed to sunlight while taking the drug.
  • Doxycycline Reactions
    Doxycycline may cause problems in some people, such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. This eMedTV Web resource discusses other negative reactions to doxycycline, including potential side effects and general safety concerns with this drug.
  • Doxycycline Risks
    Some of the potential risks with using doxycycline may include diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. This eMedTV Web article describes other possible risks, including potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Doxycycline Safety Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, you may not be able to take doxycycline safely if you have certain medical conditions. This page further discusses important safety information on doxycycline, including what to tell your doctor before taking this drug.
  • Doxycycline Side Effects
    Doxycycline side effects may include vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, and loss of appetite. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible side effects, including more serious but rare problems, such as liver damage, vision changes, or tongue swelling.
  • Doxycycline Tablets
    A doctor may prescribe doxycycline to treat various conditions, such as bacterial infections. This eMedTV article looks at the tablet form of doxycycline, including information on how the medication works, available strengths, and general precautions.
  • Doxycycline Uses
    Doxycycline uses are primarily for the treatment of bacterial and anthrax infections, malaria, and acne. This eMedTV page explains how the drug can also prevent malaria and treat infections that are resistant to another antibiotic called vancomycin.
  • Doxycyline
    Doxycycline is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections, acne, and anthrax infections. This eMedTV article describes how doxycycline works and lists side effects that may occur with the drug. Doxycyline is a common misspelling of doxycycline.
  • Drug Interactions With Cefazolin
    As explained in this eMedTV article, you can help avoid potential drug interactions with cefazolin by telling your doctor about all medicines and vitamins you are using. This page lists the products that can cause problems and describes what may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Cefepime
    As this eMedTV resource explains, combining certain antibiotics or birth control pills with cefepime can cause potentially serious interactions. A list of drugs and other products that could cause problems with cefepime is given in this article.
  • Drug Interactions With Cefotaxime
    As this eMedTV selection discusses, using birth control pills or certain antibiotics with cefotaxime can cause serious and unwanted interactions. Other drugs are listed in this article, as well as an explanation on how to minimize your risk for problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Cefoxitin
    Combining cefoxitin with certain products can make this antibiotic less effective or cause side effects. This eMedTV page contains a list of drugs and other products that can cause interactions with cefoxitin and covers what your doctor may recommend.
  • Drug Interactions With Ceftazidime
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, ceftazidime can interact with diuretics, probenecid, and many other drugs. This article tells you what you need to know about taking other medications with ceftazidime, including potential complications.
  • Drug Interactions With Cefuroxime Axetil
    This eMedTV Web article explains that when certain medicines, such as diuretics or probenecid, are taken with cefuroxime axetil, drug interactions can occur. This page lists other possible interactions and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic
    There are no known drug interactions with ciprofloxacin ophthalmic at this time. As this article on the eMedTV Web site explains, however, it is possible that interactions with this eye medication may be discovered at a later date.
  • Drug Interactions With Ciprofloxacin/Dexamethasone
    So far, no medications have been shown to cause drug interactions with ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone. As this eMedTV page explains, however, it is still important to talk to your doctor about any other medications you are taking before using this ear drop.
  • Drug Interactions With Ciprofloxacin/Hydrocortisone
    As this eMedTV article explains, there are no known ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone drug interactions; however, such problems cannot be ruled out. This page explains why this is the case, based on the way in which the medicine is absorbed into the body.
  • Drug Interactions With Cleocin
    Because Cleocin drug interactions can lead to problems, this eMedTV page offers information on how to reduce your risk. This includes a list of medicines that may react negatively with Cleocin, as well as information on the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Keflex
    Keflex can interact with drugs like metformin, probenecid, and amikacin. This eMedTV page explains the various effects that these and other drug interactions with Keflex can have and includes things your healthcare provider may do to prevent them.
  • Drug Interactions With Moxifloxacin Eye Drops
    It is unlikely that moxifloxacin eye drops would interact with other drugs. This part of the eMedTV site explains why this is so and stresses that it's still important to talk with your healthcare provider about any interactions that may apply to you.
  • Drug Interactions With Ofloxacin Ophthalmic Solution
    As this eMedTV selection points out, there are currently no known drug interactions with ofloxacin ophthalmic solution, but reactions could always be discovered at a later date. This article offers more details on interactions with this eye drop.
  • Drug Interactions With Ofloxacin Otic Solution
    There are no known drug interactions with ofloxacin otic solution at this time. As this article on the eMedTV Web site explains, however, it is possible that interactions with this prescription ear medication may be discovered at a later date.
  • Drug Interactions With Retapamulin
    At this time there are no known drug interactions with retapamulin. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains why this is the case and describes some of the precautions you should still take before using this prescription antibiotic.
  • Erithromycin
    A wide range of bacterial infections can be treated with the medication erythromycin. This eMedTV segment explains what the drug is used for, how it works, and possible side effects. Erithromycin is a common misspelling of erythromycin.
  • Erthyromycin
    Several different conditions can be treated with erythromycin. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, it is not appropriate for all situations. Available forms and dosing are also discussed. Erthyromycin is a common misspelling of erythromycin.
  • Erythromicin
    The antibiotic erythromycin has been approved to treat a wide range of conditions. This page of the eMedTV library lists some of these infections and discusses possible side effects of the drug. Erythromicin is a common misspelling of erythromycin.
  • Erythromyacin
    This eMedTV page explains that bacterial infections such as acne, PID, chlamydia, and pneumonia can be treated with the versatile drug erythromycin. However, it cannot be used in all situations. Erythromyacin is a common misspelling of erythromycin.
  • Erythromycin
    Erythromycin is a common antibiotic used in many different medications. It comes in a variety of forms. This eMedTV segment takes a detailed look at this prescription medicine, with information on side effects, what to do in case of overdose, and more.
  • Erythromycin and Breastfeeding
    Most doctors consider erythromycin safe while breastfeeding (although the manufacturers doesn't recommend it). This eMedTV article explains that this is because the drug is often given directly to infants and only causes problems in rare cases.
  • Erythromycin and Pregnancy
    In general, women who are pregnant can take erythromycin without causing any harm to the fetus. This eMedTV page, however, explains that while animal studies suggest that the drug is safe, problems cannot be ruled out and a doctor should be consulted.
  • Erythromycin Antibiotic Information
    The antibiotic erythromycin can be used to treat a wide range of infections. This eMedTV Web page lists several of them and provides important information on how the drug works, what to consider before taking it, and safety precautions to keep in mind.
  • Erythromycin Dosage
    The exact dose of erythromycin a person is prescribed will depend on many different factors, which this eMedTV page lists. Guidelines for various conditions are included for adults and children, as are tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment process.
  • Erythromycin Drug Interactions
    Several different drugs can interact with erythromycin, such as warfarin, digoxin, and statins. This page of the eMedTV site provides a more complete list of medicines that can react with erythromycin and explains the problems that can occur as a result.
  • Erythromycin Oral
    There are topical, injectable, and oral forms of erythromycin. This selection from the eMedTV site provides important information for when this drug is taken orally, including when and how to take it and tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment process.
  • Erythromycin Overdose
    While the medicine is not particularly toxic, an erythromycin overdose could still be dangerous. This page of the eMedTV archives describes the effects that could occur with an overdose, such as diarrhea, and explains the available treatment options.
  • Erythromycin Pills
    Erythromycin is available in many different forms, including pills, capsules, and ointments. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of this medication, including how it works and general dosing recommendations, with a link to more information.
  • Erythromycin Side Effects
    Often, the erythromycin side effects a person experiences depend on the form the drug is in. This eMedTV page explains that with the oral and injectable forms, diarrhea is a common reaction. Other side effects are also listed, including serious ones.
  • Erythromycin Warnings and Precautions
    In rare cases, erythromycin has been known to cause liver damage or myasthenia gravis. This eMedTV segment provides other warnings and precautions with erythromycin to be aware of, including a list of people who should avoid the drug.
  • Eurythromycin
    While some people do not have any problems when treating a bacterial infection with erythromycin, this eMedTV article explains that side effects are possible and lists some of the more serious ones. Eurythromycin is a common misspelling of erythromycin.
  • Factiva Antibiotic
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Factive is used to treat pneumonia and bronchitis. This page discusses how this prescription antibiotic works and describes some general safety concerns. Factiva antibiotic is a common misspelling of Factive antibiotic.
  • Factive
    Factive is an antibiotic prescribed to treat bronchitis and pneumonia. This page of the eMedTV Web site provides an overview of this medicine, including details on how it works, potential side effects, dosing tips, safety precautions, and more.
  • Factive and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Factive (gemifloxacin) passes through human breast milk. This eMedTV page explains how no human research has been done on the potential risks of breastfeeding while using Factive, and why nursing mothers may be advised to avoid this drug.
  • Factive and Pregnancy
    If you are expecting, tell your doctor before taking Factive (gemifloxacin). This eMedTV page describes what happened when the active ingredient in Factive was given to pregnant animals, and discusses the manufacturer's recommendations on the topic.
  • Factive and Tendon Rupture
    If you take Factive (gemifloxacin), you may have an increased risk for tendon problems. This eMedTV page discusses tendon ruptures and other tendon problems that may occur with Factive, including a list of some of the possible signs of these problems.
  • Factive Antibiotic Information
    Your doctor may prescribe Factive to treat certain bacterial infections, including bronchitis and pneumonia. This eMedTV page offers more information on Factive, including possible side effects of the antibiotic and general safety precautions.
  • Factive Dosage
    The usual dose of Factive for treating bronchitis or pneumonia is 320 mg once daily for five or seven days. This eMedTV Web selection discusses the factors that may affect your dosage and outlines some important tips for using this antibiotic.
  • Factive Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV article explains, drug interactions can occur when Factive is combined with corticosteroids, the typhoid vaccine, certain antacids, or a number of other medicines. This page offers a detailed look at the problems these reactions may cause.
  • Factive Overdose
    If you use too much Factive, you may experience coordination problems or seizures. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes what to expect with an overdose, including information on how a healthcare provider may treat any problems that occur.
  • Factive Side Effects
    Headaches, diarrhea, and a rash are among the common side effects of Factive. This eMedTV resource lists several other possible reactions to this medication, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical care.
  • Factive Uses
    Factive is prescribed for treating bronchitis and pneumonia in adults. This eMedTV Web selection further describes specific uses for Factive, including possible off-label (unapproved) uses. This page also explains how this antibiotic medication works.
  • Factive Warnings and Precautions
    Taking Factive may increase your risk for neurological side effects or other problems. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for Factive, including information on who should not use this antibiotic.
  • Flagel
    Flagyl is an antibiotic that can be prescribed to treat a variety of different infections. This eMedTV resource describes how Flagyl works and explains how often the drug is taken and what forms it comes in. Flagel is a common misspelling of Flagyl.
  • Flagell
    The antibiotic Flagyl is used for treating certain types of parasitic or bacterial infections. This eMedTV article describes the various forms of Flagyl and explains what side effects may occur with the drug. Flagell is a common misspelling of Flagyl.
  • Flagella
    Your doctor may prescribe Flagyl if you have a certain type of bacterial or parasitic infection. This eMedTV page explains how often Flagyl is taken and what to review with your doctor before using the drug. Flagella is a common misspelling of Flagyl.
  • Flagil
    Flagyl is a prescription drug approved to treat certain bacterial and parasitic infections. This eMedTV segment explains how Flagyl works and lists potential side effects of the medication. Flagil is a common misspelling of Flagyl.
  • Flagile
    Flagyl, a prescription antibiotic, is licensed to treat a wide variety of infections (including STIs). This eMedTV page explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this medication. Flagile is a common misspelling of Flagyl.
  • Flagyl
    Flagyl is an antibiotic used to treat various infections, including certain sexually transmitted infections. This eMedTV page explains how Flagyl works and offers more details on the drug's specific uses, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Flagyl 250 mg Tablets
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains when 250-mg Flagyl tablets are used and describes some of the factors that may affect your specific dose, such as weight. This article also provides a link to more detailed information on dosing.
  • Flagyl 375 mg
    As this eMedTV page explains, if you have trichomoniasis, your doctor may prescribe Flagyl 375 mg tablets twice daily for seven days. This page takes a brief look at dosing for this drug and provides a link to more detailed dosing guidelines.
  • Flagyl 500 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV article explains, Flagyl tablets can be prescribed in a number of strengths, including 500 mg. This article offers a brief overview of dosing information for this products, explaining factors that will affect how much you should take.
  • Flagyl 750 mg Tablets
    This eMedTV Web page discusses general dosing guidelines for treating bacterial infections with Flagyl. For example, the 750-mg tablets of Flagyl ER are only approved for treating bacterial vaginosis. This article also links to more detailed information.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2014 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.