Antibiotics Articles A-Z

Omnicef and Pregnancy - Precautions and Warnings With Retapamulin

This page contains links to eMedTV Antibiotics Articles containing information on subjects from Omnicef and Pregnancy to Precautions and Warnings With Retapamulin. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Omnicef and Pregnancy
    There are few risks reported with Omnicef, and pregnancy issues have not been noted as a problem. This eMedTV resource explains the FDA's pregnancy category system and discusses Omnicef's potential effects on unborn babies.
  • Omnicef Antibiotic
    This eMedTV Web resource discusses important information on Omnicef, an antibiotic used for treating various bacterial infections, such as pneumonia and sinus infections. This page also explains why Omnicef may not be suitable for some people.
  • Omnicef Capsules
    Available in the form of a liquid or capsules, Omnicef is used to treat various bacterial infections. This eMedTV Web page offers more detail on Omnicef, including information on how this medication works, available strengths, and general precautions.
  • Omnicef Dangers
    You may not be able to safely use Omnicef if you have certain medical problems (such as kidney disease). This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at other potential dangers to be aware of before starting treatment with Omnicef.
  • Omnicef Dosage
    The suggested Omnicef dosage for most bacterial infections is 300 mg twice daily or 600 mg once daily. This eMedTV resource provides dosage recommendations for children and offers precautions and tips on taking the antibiotic.
  • Omnicef Drug Interactions
    When certain medicines are mixed with Omnicef, drug interactions may occur. As this page of the eMedTV archives explains, these potentially negative interactions may result in decreased or increased levels of Omnicef in your system.
  • Omnicef for an Ear Infection
    If you have an ear infection, Omnicef may help to relieve symptoms. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at using this medicine for ear infections, including general dosing guidelines and tips for safely using this product.
  • Omnicef for Children
    As this eMedTV segment explains, children as young as six months old can use Omnicef. This resource further discusses the safety of using this antibiotic for children and also describes some general dosing guidelines.
  • Omnicef for Infants
    Omnicef is approved for babies as young as six months old who have certain bacterial infections. This eMedTV article further discusses infants and Omnicef, and also explains how a healthcare provider will determine your child's Omnicef dosage.
  • Omnicef for Pneumonia
    This eMedTV Web article explains that when pneumonia is treated with Omnicef, the drug works by inhibiting the bacteria from growing and multiplying. This page also explains how this medication works and offers some general dosing tips.
  • Omnicef Indications
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Omnicef is a prescription drug used to treat various types of bacterial infections. This page takes a closer look at the indications for Omnicef, including information on its safety in children as young as six months old.
  • Omnicef Medication Information
    This eMedTV page provides important information on Omnicef, a medication used for treating bacterial infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis. This page also explains why Omnicef may not be suitable for some people and lists possible side effects.
  • Omnicef Oral
    There are a couple of different forms of Omnicef -- oral solutions (liquid) and capsules. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains what Omnicef is used for, lists available strengths, and describes potential side effects of this medicine.
  • Omnicef Pills
    Available as a liquid or as pills, Omnicef is a drug used to treat various bacterial infections. This eMedTV page offers more detail on how this medication works and what to tell your doctor before taking it.
  • Omnicef Precautions and Warnings
    Omnicef precautions and warnings include people for whom the drug is not suitable and possible side effects. This eMedTV page explains, for example, that about 10 percent of people who are allergic to penicillin may also be allergic to Omnicef.
  • Omnicef Reactions
    Omnicef may cause problems in some people, such as diarrhea, nausea, and headaches. This eMedTV Web resource discusses other possible adverse reactions to Omnicef and explains who may not be able to safely use this medication.
  • Omnicef Risks
    Some of the potential risks with Omnicef may include diarrhea, headaches, and nausea. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes other possible drugs risks, including potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Omnicef Safety Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, you may not be able to take Omnicef safely if you have medical conditions such as kidney disease. This page further discusses important safety information on Omnicef, including what to tell your doctor before using this drug.
  • Omnicef Side Effects
    Common side effects of Omnicef may include vomiting, headache, and yeast infection in women. This eMedTV resource lists other side effects that can occur, including potentially serious symptoms, such as watery diarrhea, hives, or wheezing.
  • Omnicef Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, several bacterial infections can be treated by Omnicef. Uses of the drug include the treatment of skin infection, tonsillitis, and bronchitis. It can be used to treat adults and children ages 6 months to 12 years.
  • Oxacillin
    Available as a generic product only, oxacillin is prescribed to treat certain bacterial infections. This eMedTV article covers specific uses, how the antibiotic works, possible side effects, and more. Links to various topics are also given.
  • Oxacillin and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV segment discusses the safety of using oxacillin while breastfeeding, including details on whether this drug passes through breast milk and potential risks it might pose to a nursing infant. General recommendations are also included.
  • Oxacillin and Pregnancy
    Using oxacillin during pregnancy is generally considered safe. This part of the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at the results of animal studies on this topic and explains what to do if you become pregnant while using this drug.
  • Oxacillin Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, oxacillin is given intravenously (by IV) or as an intramuscular injection every four to six hours. More dosing instructions for oxacillin are given in this article, including details on how the amount is calculated.
  • Oxacillin Drug Information
    Oxacillin is prescribed for the treatment of infections caused by certain bacteria. This eMedTV Web page features more information on oxacillin, including how it is administered, potential side effects, and more.
  • Oxacillin Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page discusses, combining certain drugs (such as tetracycline antibiotics) with oxacillin can cause interactions that decrease the effectiveness of this antibiotic. This article goes into more detail about potential interactions.
  • Oxacillin Overdose
    Let your healthcare provider know immediately if you believe you have received too much oxacillin. This eMedTV article lists potential overdose effects, such as vomiting and seizures, and describes how these complications might be treated.
  • Oxacillin Side Effects
    Oxacillin can cause nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting in some people who use this antibiotic. This eMedTV page examines other potential oxacillin side effects, including those that may lead to dangerous complications.
  • Oxacillin Uses
    Oxacillin is approved to treat certain infections that have become resistant to other antibiotics. This eMedTV Web page covers more information on specific uses for oxacillin. It also describes how this antibiotic works and lists off-label uses.
  • Oxacillin Warnings and Precautions
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, some people who use oxacillin may develop complications like bloody diarrhea or dangerous allergic reactions. This article takes a detailed look at other precautions and warnings for using oxacillin safely.
  • Oxicillin
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, oxacillin is an antibiotic prescribed to treat various bacterial infections. This page describes what to discuss with your doctor and lists potential side effects. Oxicillin is a common misspelling of oxacillin.
  • Plaquenal
    Plaquenil is a drug approved to treat malaria, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV page describes how Plaquenil works, explains how often the drug is taken, and lists its potential side effects. Plaquenal is a common misspelling of Plaquenil.
  • Plaquenil
    Plaquenil is a medication used to treat malaria, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV article also covers how Plaquenil can be used to prevent malaria, explains when and how to take the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Plaquenil and Breastfeeding
    When used for malaria, Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine) appears to be safe for use while breastfeeding. This eMedTV article offers more information on Plaquenil and breastfeeding, and explains whether this drug passes through breast milk.
  • Plaquenil and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine) during pregnancy are not known at this time. This eMedTV segment includes more information on Plaquenil and pregnancy, and explains whether the drug is likely to affect a fetus.
  • Plaquenil Dosage
    For treating lupus, the recommended starting Plaquenil dosage is 400 mg once or twice a day. This eMedTV Web page also offers Plaquenil dosing guidelines for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and malaria (including malaria prevention).
  • Plaquenil Drug Information
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on Plaquenil, an antimalarial drug. Topics covered in this article include when and how it is taken, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Plaquenil Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Plaquenil interactions include digoxin, cyclosporine, and mefloquine. This eMedTV resource contains a more detailed list of drugs that may interact with Plaquenil and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Plaquenil Overdose
    A Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine) overdose may cause drowsiness, headaches, or seizures. This page from the eMedTV library lists other potential effects of a Plaquenil overdose and describes various treatment options that are currently available.
  • Plaquenil Side Effects
    Potential Plaquenil side effects include nightmares, weight loss, and diarrhea. This eMedTV resource provides a list of other possible side effects of Plaquenil, including serious ones that require medical attention (such as hearing loss or seizures).
  • Plaquenil Uses
    Plaquenil is used for treating and preventing certain types of malaria. As this eMedTV page explains, Plaquenil uses may also include the treatment of lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Off-label uses of the drug are also listed in this article.
  • Plaquenil Warnings and Precautions
    Plaquenil can damage the retina of the eye, which can lead to blindness. This eMedTV page lists other side effects or complications that may occur with Plaquenil. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this drug are also listed on this page.
  • Plaquinal
    Plaquenil is an anti-malarial drug also used for treating rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. This eMedTV article describes Plaquenil in more detail and explains how it works for these various uses. Plaquinal is a common misspelling of Plaquenil.
  • Plaquinel
    Plaquenil is a prescription drug used to treat and prevent malaria infections. This page on the eMedTV site explains what else Plaquenil is used for and lists possible side effects of the medicine. Plaquinel is a common misspelling of Plaquenil.
  • Plaquinil
    Your doctor may prescribe Plaquenil to prevent malaria if you are traveling to an area of high risk. This eMedTV segment covers other Plaquenil uses and explains how the drug works for these conditions. Plaquinil is a common misspelling of Plaquenil.
  • Plaquinol
    Plaquenil is a medication that can be prescribed to treat lupus, malaria, and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV page discusses Plaquenil uses in more detail and offers general warnings for this drug. Plaquinol is a common misspelling of Plaquenil.
  • Plaqunil
    Plaquenil is a medicine used to treat malaria, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. This eMedTV Web page further explores these Plaquenil uses and explains what to tell your doctor before using this drug. Plaqunil is a common misspelling of Plaquenil.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Cefazolin
    Using cefazolin may get rid of "good" bacteria, which may lead to thrush or yeast infections. This eMedTV Web selection examines a number of important warnings and precautions to review to help ensure a safe and effective treatment with cefazolin.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Cefepime
    If you develop watery or bloody diarrhea during cefepime treatment or afterward, notify your doctor. This eMedTV Web page takes a look at the specific warnings and precautions with cefepime that are designed to help ensure safety while using this drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Cefotaxime
    Developing watery or bloody diarrhea while using cefotaxime may indicate a potentially serious problem. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at other warnings and precautions with cefotaxime and describes who may not be able to use this drug safely.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Cefoxitin
    As explained in this eMedTV article, some people may develop side effects or allergic reactions during treatment with cefoxitin. This article provides more information on the warnings and precautions associated with cefoxitin.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ceftazidime
    If you have a viral infection, such as the common cold or the flu, ceftazidime will be ineffective. This eMedTV Web article provides more safety precautions for ceftazidime, including important warnings about allergic reactions.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Cefuroxime Axetil
    Before using cefuroxime axetil, tell your doctor if you have any health conditions, such as kidney disease. This eMedTV page discusses other cefuroxime axetil warnings and precautions, and explains why this antibiotic may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ciprofloxacin
    Ciprofloxacin has been reported to cause certain heart and neurological problems. This eMedTV page offers other warnings and precautions with ciprofloxacin to be aware of, including details on why this drug may not be suitable for some people.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic
    This eMedTV Web segment explains that if you have certain allergies, you may not be able to use ciprofloxacin ophthalmic. This article outlines important precautions and warnings with ciprofloxacin ophthalmic, including what your doctor needs to know.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ciprofloxacin/Dexamethasone
    This eMedTV page lists ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone precautions and warnings, including possible reactions and details on who should not use this ear drop. This page also covers what your doctor needs to know before you begin treatment with this medicine.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ciprofloxacin/Hydrocortisone
    As this eMedTV page explains, people with a viral outer ear infection should not use ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone. Warnings and precautions also apply to people with perforated eardrums and those who are allergic to any components of the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Cleocin
    This eMedTV page provides several Cleocin warnings and precautions, including potentially serious reactions and a list of who may not be able to use this medication. This page also explains what to tell your doctor before starting this antibiotic.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Keflex
    This eMedTV page explains potentially negative interactions with Keflex, things to tell your doctor before taking the drug, potential side effects, and who should not take it. Pregnancy-related precautions and warnings with Keflex are also provided.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Moxifloxacin Eye Drops
    You should not wear contacts during treatment with moxifloxacin eye drops. Warnings and precautions, which this eMedTV resource provides, also apply to people with certain allergies and women who are pregnant (or may become pregnant) or breastfeeding.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ofloxacin Ophthalmic Solution
    Long-term use of ofloxacin ophthalmic solution could lead to a second infection. This eMedTV page lists other problems that may occur with ofloxacin ophthalmic solution. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this product are also included.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ofloxacin Otic Solution
    This eMedTV Web segment explains that if you have certain allergies, you may not be able to use ofloxacin otic solution. This article outlines important precautions and warnings with ofloxacin otic solution, including what your doctor needs to know.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Retapamulin
    If you experience a severe skin reaction with retapamulin, wipe it off immediately and contact your doctor. This eMedTV page provides more precautions and warnings with retapamulin ointment to be aware of, including what to tell your doctor beforehand.
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